Category Archives: Friday Links

Social Media Stories of the Week: 8-28-09

A collection of awesome posts from blogs that might not be on your radar. There are some case studies, some tutorials and a lot of great analysis. Enjoy!

HOW TO: Add Twitter and YouTube Tabs to Your Organization’s Facebook Page: Heather Mansfield is a social media consultant focusing on the non-profit space. Her posts on Change.org are certainly worth following, and this straightforward explanation is one of them.

Using Mobile Technology to Influence Healthcare Reform: Ben Stein’s Mobile Commons helps non-profit companies build social media strategies in really unique ways. This post shares examples from companies that have used SMS (text messages) to raise awareness among different communities about important social causes.

Chick-fil-A is the First Restaurant Chain with 1 Million Facebook Fans: I can’t believe it, either. Never underestimate the value of a good Cow Appreciation Day Photo Contest.

Numbers we track in our online/offline life: Sam Lawrence examines what it means to be a “friend” these days and delves into the numbers we track online (friends, status, dates) vs. those we track offline (sleep, weight, money). An interesting take on what metrics matter and why.

Image credit: Shutterstock

Friday Links for 8-21-09

linklove.png Here are some interesting articles I read this week I thought you might enjoy:

Social Media Charm School:“When it comes to social media, it is easy to be dazzled by big numbers and strong opinions. But often what is really needed isn’t a comprehensive strategy with metrics and targets, but a charming and intelligent human personality.” (via graphpaper)

Mobile Marketers Must Look Past The iPhone: “With all the negative press, should marketers question their own love affair with the device and its app platform?” (via Silicon Alley Insider)

Hyperlocal news makes news: the case of Everyblock: Yesterday’s reports of MSNBC’s acquisition of Adrian Holovaty’s Everyblock have generally treated the latter as a “hyperlocal news service.” And to be sure, this is abetted by some of the language Everyblock itself uses to frame and describe what it offers: a “news feed for your block” which can help you “find news nearby.” But for whatever it’s worth, I’ve never understood Everyblock’s fundamental proposition in quite this way, and here’s why I think understanding what it offers as “news” is giving it short shrift. (via Urban Omnibus)

Image credit: Shutterstock