Tag Archives: Case study

30 MORE Examples of Corporate Social Media in Action

I wrote a post for Mashable awhile back looking at 35 Examples of Corporate Social Media in Action. Since some time has passed and more companies have risen to the challenge of creating innovative social media campaigns, I thought it was time to revisit this with an expanded list of social media for business case studies from a growing number of industries:

Dominos Pizza credits Foursquare with its UK sales growth.

Monique’s Chocolates in Palo Alto used Foursquare to acquire 50 new customers.

Highland Brewing, a microbrewery in North Carolina, turned to social media to build stronger relationships with beer drinkers. Sounds tough :-)

Old Spice creates personal videos for its Facebook fans and posts them on YouTube.

Norman Regional Health System in Oklahoma spends 30 minutes a day on Twitter and Facebook.

The Red Cross uses tools like Flickr and blogs to connect directly with their supporters.

red cross twitter page

Colgate used social media to drive engagement and purchases worldwide.

Land of Nod uses online customer reviews to strengthen its community and product offerings (VIDEO).

Cisco continues to evolve its social media practice, creating snackable content internally for its employees.

Vitamin Water let its fans create a new flavor on Facebook.

Dreyer’s leveraged characters from their “Share the Love” campaign to create a mobile game for the iPhone.

HP’s viral video campaign has some solid social media metrics behind it.

The Asia Foundation of San Francisco used Facebook for its recent Books for Asia campaign.

The NBA used social media (Twitter, Facebook, Gowalla) during the NBA Finals.

JetBlue uses Twitter very successfully for customer service support.

Xerox uses social media as part of a product launch (VIDEO – start watching about 2:30 in).

The Brooklyn Museum created a page to connect its Foursquare community.

brooklyn museum on foursquare

Leo Burnett’s use of Twitter during Cannes garnered more publicity for the firm than any other stunt in company history.

Spanish shoe company Munich uses its social media presence on Facebook to bring together its community in the real world.

Wells-Fargo uses social media during a financial crisis (VIDEO).

Pb Elemental Design is an architecture firm in Seattle that focused on buildings its social media presence on Facebook.

Intel explains how it has leveraged Facebook to grow their fan base to more than 115,000 fans.

Sharpie has some nice examples of how to make social media work on a small budget (VIDEO).

A luxury hotel in Greece used social media to increase all of its web marketing goals.

Rapper Snoop Dogg made over $200K selling branded clothing in virtual worlds.

Warner Brothers provides a case study of how NOT to engage bloggers and how NOT to react when your strategy misses the mark.

NPR shows how and when their listeners access their content on mobile platforms with lots of numbers.

Air Canada learned a tough lesson about monitoring Twitter and how a crisis can easily escalate.

Omo Laundry Detergent in Brazil hid GPS devices in 50 detergent boxes and then visits the winner’s houses to award the prizes.

Mazda launched a Facebook game to promote its new car.

Chesapeake Energy Corp. uses a host of social media tools to stay closer to its customers.

Punch Pizza in The Twin Cities uses Flickr, Facebook and Twitter to sell more pizza.

Einstein Bagels used Facebook to distribute a coupon, and to keep their fans abreast of updates when the coupon link didn’t work.

To follow the conversation and discover even more corporate social media case studies, click here.

CHALLENGE: 2009 Social Media Case Studies

dolphin and cow

If you attended any social media webinar, seminar, conference, panel or similar session in the last 12 months, the case studies referenced by the speakers to showcase the value of social media likely included Dell, Blend-Tec, Starbucks and/or Comcast.

And you probably heard them referenced multiple times by multiple people. The problem was that the social media professionals (call them consultants, gurus, experts, whatever) would take the microphone and share the same four or five stories to illustrate successful examples of  corporate social media work. It was the same redundant thing every time.

I’m just as guilty as everyone else. Those case studies were standards in my deck over the last year and honestly, they were fantastic for introducing the possibilities of social media to an audience largely unfamiliar with the platforms and skeptical of their relevance. I might still use them from time to time with people new to the subject. But really, it’s time to move on.

If you’re still unfamiliar with these case studies, there is ample reference material online that I’ll link to here:

GOOD NEWS

It worked! The hundreds of hours spent evangelizing the benefits of social media combined with the crappiness of the current economy transformed words to action. Many brands have launched blogs, signed up for Twitter and established Facebook Fan pages. Often these case studies helped them to do it.

BAD NEWS

Many still don’t get it. It’s not enough to just set up a social media account and check it off the list. There’s still a lack of strategy behind many of these engagements, and part of the blame falls on how it’s presented (while the other part is management bureaucracy, budgets and a whole lot of other factors beyond our control). As trusted advisors, it’s important we illustrate the benefits of a solid social media strategy by using examples from a diverse set of industries.

OUR JOB

If you are someone who is fortunate enough to have a speaking gig or two lined up in 2009 , I hope you’ll come armed with some new case studies. It would be very impressive if they were case studies from projects you actually worked on. At the very least, conduct a bit of original research so that your version of the case study has a nugget or two that we haven’t heard a thousand times before. We don’t want to hear only about companies that are doing a great job, but those that struggled out of the gate as well. We don’t want only big companies, but also small businesses and players in the B2B space.

You can start by checking out this wiki by Peter Kim that is updated with the latest and greatest examples of corporate social media.

Of course, I’m going to do the same. The gauntlet has been thrown. Bring it.

Photo credit: Tidewater_Muse

Reblog this post [with Zemanta]

Twitter Case Study: Motrin Moms

This weekend, there was a bit of excitement on Twitter as outraged moms around the world responded to this advertisement by Motrin:

The tone of the ad is conspiratorial. It’s supposed to be a mom talking directly to other moms who can identify with the the pain caused by carrying around her baby in various types of slings attached to her body.

I have not carried around a baby so I have no idea whether or not it hurts. But so far, I’m convinced by the ad. I mean, an extra 7-15 pounds (is that what babies weigh?) attached to my hips, my front, my back…I would imagine that would hurt after a while, no matter how ingenious the contraption.

Apparently, I’m wrong. And that, my friends, is where the value of market research comes in. And if you don’t do the research, that’s where the true value of social media comes in.

Apparently, there are many moms who have carried around multiple children on their back, their hips, their front. They were not in pain. In fact, quite the opposite. They are not happy with the Motrin ad campaign, and they want you to know about it.

Over the weekend moms on Twitter united in voicing their displeasure with the Motrin ad . They used "#motrinmoms" as the tag for the threaded conversation, making it easy for people to follow.

In less than 24 hours, this video was created as a response to the ad that intersperses the Twitter conversation with images of moms carrying their children in many of the states mentioned in the ad. It’s pretty powerful:

Also, you can see that the story was picked up by mainstream media as well and will likely appear in print tomorrow or the day after.

Motrin’s website was crashed by the traffic, and has yet to recover. Not good.

What’s surprising to most people is not that there was outrage over an ad that didn’t resonate with its target audience so much as the lack of response from Motrin (or its parent company — Johnson & Johnson). Either they are not monitoring some of the most important conversation channels for their target audience (mommy bloggers) like Twitter, Facebook and the blogosphere, or they have not empowered their advertising, public relations or communications teams to respond immediately.

This is far from played out. There are probably some who will argue this is being blown out of proportion. In some ways, I might agree. But let’s look at some initial lessons:

LISTEN : People are talking about companies and brands every day on a variety of platforms. It is the responsibility of the marketing and communications team to monitor these conversations, whether or not they choose to participate. While its not possible to follow everything, even the most simple tools (RSS, Google Alerts) will catch things like this.

BE TRANSPARENT : When you make a mistake, apologize to the community and learn from it. This is an opportunity for Motrin to better understand its audience and to begin a conversation that probably should have started long ago.

There are many more, and I’m sure we’ll all learn from how Motrin handles this in the coming days.

Further reading: Mommy Bloggers Assimilate Johnson & Johnson , Forbes , Pistachio

Best Posts of the Week

Thought I’d share a couple of interesting and useful posts I’ve read this week:

Enjoy. And if you have any feedback, please leave them for the bloggers at the end of their posts. Bloggers love feedback!