Tag Archives: twitter

30 MORE Examples of Corporate Social Media in Action

I wrote a post for Mashable awhile back looking at 35 Examples of Corporate Social Media in Action. Since some time has passed and more companies have risen to the challenge of creating innovative social media campaigns, I thought it was time to revisit this with an expanded list of social media for business case studies from a growing number of industries:

Dominos Pizza credits Foursquare with its UK sales growth.

Monique’s Chocolates in Palo Alto used Foursquare to acquire 50 new customers.

Highland Brewing, a microbrewery in North Carolina, turned to social media to build stronger relationships with beer drinkers. Sounds tough :-)

Old Spice creates personal videos for its Facebook fans and posts them on YouTube.

Norman Regional Health System in Oklahoma spends 30 minutes a day on Twitter and Facebook.

The Red Cross uses tools like Flickr and blogs to connect directly with their supporters.

red cross twitter page

Colgate used social media to drive engagement and purchases worldwide.

Land of Nod uses online customer reviews to strengthen its community and product offerings (VIDEO).

Cisco continues to evolve its social media practice, creating snackable content internally for its employees.

Vitamin Water let its fans create a new flavor on Facebook.

Dreyer’s leveraged characters from their “Share the Love” campaign to create a mobile game for the iPhone.

HP’s viral video campaign has some solid social media metrics behind it.

The Asia Foundation of San Francisco used Facebook for its recent Books for Asia campaign.

The NBA used social media (Twitter, Facebook, Gowalla) during the NBA Finals.

JetBlue uses Twitter very successfully for customer service support.

Xerox uses social media as part of a product launch (VIDEO – start watching about 2:30 in).

The Brooklyn Museum created a page to connect its Foursquare community.

brooklyn museum on foursquare

Leo Burnett’s use of Twitter during Cannes garnered more publicity for the firm than any other stunt in company history.

Spanish shoe company Munich uses its social media presence on Facebook to bring together its community in the real world.

Wells-Fargo uses social media during a financial crisis (VIDEO).

Pb Elemental Design is an architecture firm in Seattle that focused on buildings its social media presence on Facebook.

Intel explains how it has leveraged Facebook to grow their fan base to more than 115,000 fans.

Sharpie has some nice examples of how to make social media work on a small budget (VIDEO).

A luxury hotel in Greece used social media to increase all of its web marketing goals.

Rapper Snoop Dogg made over $200K selling branded clothing in virtual worlds.

Warner Brothers provides a case study of how NOT to engage bloggers and how NOT to react when your strategy misses the mark.

NPR shows how and when their listeners access their content on mobile platforms with lots of numbers.

Air Canada learned a tough lesson about monitoring Twitter and how a crisis can easily escalate.

Omo Laundry Detergent in Brazil hid GPS devices in 50 detergent boxes and then visits the winner’s houses to award the prizes.

Mazda launched a Facebook game to promote its new car.

Chesapeake Energy Corp. uses a host of social media tools to stay closer to its customers.

Punch Pizza in The Twin Cities uses Flickr, Facebook and Twitter to sell more pizza.

Einstein Bagels used Facebook to distribute a coupon, and to keep their fans abreast of updates when the coupon link didn’t work.

To follow the conversation and discover even more corporate social media case studies, click here.

David Perez is Disruptive

David Perez is a Chicago based recruiter for Leo Burnett. He convinced his bosses to let him go to the Cannes Film Festival under one condition: he had to wear a webcam attached to his glasses the entire time and do anything (yes, anything) that his Twitter followers request. Thus, David on Demand was born.

So far, he’s had to get a tattoo of the Twitter fail whale, buy balloons for children, pole dance and generally make a fool of himself in public, all the while talking to his Twitter followers.

David (or rather, by the sound of it, David’s PR people) was kind enough to answer a couple of questions before his trip via email:

Q: Tell us a little about how this idea went from a scheme for a free trip to a legitimate ticket to Cannes.

It is widely known that I have always wanted to go to Cannes. So when I learned about this social media adventure, I quickly volunteered and helped sell it into my boss.

David on Demand is a social media experiment that takes living vicariously to the next level. It is created by Leo Burnett and combines three very important elements in modern marketing – spontaneity, creativity and real-time technology. For 24 hours a day, six days straight, I will be your eyes and ears at the Cannes Lions International Advertising Festival.

Q: What I like about this PR stunt is that you are not an actor or an intern, but a creative recruiter. How do you think this will help with recruitment?

It will help recruitment tremendously! Cannes is all about creative talent and networking, and I am the guy who can help people connect the dots. Always wanted to work in advertising? I can show the world not at Cannes what it’s really like and my followers can direct me to talk to people they have always looked up to or want to learn from. Or, people can send me a link to their portfolio and it just may end up in front of key decision makers at Cannes.

Q: Do you have a budget for what you can spend on activities people request on Twitter? What do you want to do the most?

I’m hoping that both advertising enthusiasts and inquisitive consumers take the opportunity to Tweet me to attend the most sought after seminars, meet with creative luminaries, and participate in the award ceremonies. But let’s be honest here, I’m sure people will tell me to jump in a fountain or yell something spontaneously in the middle of a speech. And then you’ll have your crazy boundary-pushing requests that I won’t do. I have limits.

But again, I hope people seize the opportunity to tell me to interview people they want to hear and learn from, send them their portfolios so I can check them out, or help me chart his journey at Cannes so I can deliver what’s going on to the folks back home.

Q: Tell us a bit about what technology you’re using to pull this off.

I am sporting web-enabled glasses, a backpack with a mobile live streaming device, around the clock access to my Twitter feed and a dedicated “on-demand” crew. I will be the most connected man at Cannes! I am wearing a backpack that essentially holds six 3G phones connected to 11 antennas that will grab signals and broadcast his experiences live to David on Demand. I am wearing a camera on my glasses that will take and record everything I do for 24 hours a day for six days. The live feed will be sent to Justin.tv for the world to see. The site actually has three channels – the main screen and two additional angles of David on Demand. Viewers will be able to view the different channels and even see what I experienced earlier in the day.

Thanks, Dave!

I love this stunt. David isn’t a paid actor, nor is he an intern. He’s a fearless recruiter and he’s really entertaining to watch! And if a recruiter is willing to pull a bold, attention getting stunt like this, what does it say about the company? Would you want to work someplace like this? I would.

Tagnic: Are You Playing the New Twitter Game?

tagnic_l.png

Tagnic is my new favorite game on Twitter. Unlike previous games like Spymaster that annoyed and alienated both friends and customers alike, there’s no DM spam and playing is pretty unobtrusive. In fact, your friends might not even know you’re playing until you let them in on it.

Tagnic is the first social game created by a young startup called SocialBomb. I am friends with its founders (@doryex, @scottiev and @rebelprince), which is how I came to start playing.

HOW IT WORKS

Start by signing up here and following @tagnic on Twitter so that the bot can keep track of your tweets. Then, when you’re writing to someone, you can assign them different descriptive words by adding a plus sign (+) before the word in your tweet.

For example, if I wanted to play with my friend Paull Young (@paullyoung), I could write, “@paullyoung is a PR +crimefighter and great +blogger.” Paull would then receive “crimefigher” and “blogging” points.

Similar to the popular iPhone/Android game Foursquare, Tagnic assigns badges based on various combinations of words. Here’s an example.

What I like about this game is that it’s social, it’s fun and it’s a new way to interact with your friends on Twitter. This of it as personal hashtags.

BRAND OPPORTUNITIES

Games like Tagnic are an opportunity to help better define our social interactions in a fun and engaging way. While I have no idea what Social Bomb plans are for further Tagnic development, imagine how a brand could get involved by sponsoring a badge.

For example, if a user receives a combination of words like “caffeine,” “addict,” “coffee,” “awake,” and “Starbucks,” that individual could receive the Starbucks Java Junkie badge.

Marketers could also reward users for obtaining certain badges related to their brand or gain insight into how people talk about their brand based on a combination of words.

CONCLUSION

Tagnic is still in its early stages of development. I want to be able to showcase my badges easily on my Twitter profile, not just on the Tagnic page. But the concept is really strong and has the potential to add a new level of fun on top of an already highly engaging platform. Give it a try. It might take a quick explanation to get your friends/followers involved, but once they catch on, you won’t be able to stop.

@Tagnic is +addictive, +fun and +easy to use!

Once you’ve played, please leaves some feedback about it below!

Social Media Stories of the Week: 8-28-09

A collection of awesome posts from blogs that might not be on your radar. There are some case studies, some tutorials and a lot of great analysis. Enjoy!

HOW TO: Add Twitter and YouTube Tabs to Your Organization’s Facebook Page: Heather Mansfield is a social media consultant focusing on the non-profit space. Her posts on Change.org are certainly worth following, and this straightforward explanation is one of them.

Using Mobile Technology to Influence Healthcare Reform: Ben Stein’s Mobile Commons helps non-profit companies build social media strategies in really unique ways. This post shares examples from companies that have used SMS (text messages) to raise awareness among different communities about important social causes.

Chick-fil-A is the First Restaurant Chain with 1 Million Facebook Fans: I can’t believe it, either. Never underestimate the value of a good Cow Appreciation Day Photo Contest.

Numbers we track in our online/offline life: Sam Lawrence examines what it means to be a “friend” these days and delves into the numbers we track online (friends, status, dates) vs. those we track offline (sleep, weight, money). An interesting take on what metrics matter and why.

Image credit: Shutterstock

Why People Tweet

In a survey conducted by TNS and The Conference Board on how Americans use Twitter, almost 42% of respondents claimed they did so to keep in touch with friends.

The second biggest reason was to update their status.

Notice that “build a relationship with a brand” didn’t make the list.

Just because we see one use for a platform doesn’t mean that our audience sees it the same way. The other important take away is to see that there is no one “right” way to use Twitter. YOU are the audience that you’re trying to reach, so what type of engagement are YOU looking for from a brand?

Graph credit: emarketer

How Dell Generated $3 million in Sales Using Twitter

Dell Outlet on TwitterThere was an exciting announcement recently from the folks at Dell that the company has surpassed $3 million in sales as a result of promotions offered via the @DellOutlet Twitter account. While many will likely tout this as proof of “social media ROI,” there’s a lot more to the story.

Here’s what I think Dell did to generate that type of revenue. If your company can mimic this model, you’ll probably be able to make your first million using Twitter as well:

FAIL
Years before any other company had to consider the implications of ignoring customers online, Jeff Jarvis and an army of unsatisfied Dell users coined the term, “Dell Hell,” forcing the company to listen, even if they weren’t ready.

FAIL AGAIN
When Dell finally launched its first blog in July 2006, which was titled One2One, the company immediately changed its name to Direct2Dell due to the existence of a certain pornography site bearing the same name. A minor embarrassment, but one that was easily overlooked. Dell was at last talking with its customers.

FAIL BIGGER
When the Consumerist published a post from a former Dell sales associate, the company responded with a cease and desist letter from its legal department. This generated even more negative attention for their social media efforts. Only days later did the company respond by using its blog.

FAIL EVERYWHERE
Remember Second Life? It was the Twitter of 2007. Dell launched an island and tried selling PCs via the virtual world interface. While the island had some exciting features, it was often vacant and likely never became the revenue source some expected. However, the Island still exists and the Dell team (led by the amazing Laura Thomas) continues to actively participate in the community by hosting a variety of events for Second Life residents and Dell customers. The company learned how the Second Life community wanted to Dell to participate and the company adapted better than most.

I’m being dramatic by using the word ‘failure’ to describe some of its early forays into social media. Dell tried a lot of different tactics to find which ones resonated with their audience. Sometimes the results of the experiments with community building might not have yielded the expected results. But these lessons were valuable learning opportunities for the company (as well as for the rest of us) to better understand the model for two way conversations between companies and its constituencies.

From these lessons, Dell was able to better prepare for the social media engagement their customers demanded. Let’s look at some of the things they’ve done very well:

DEDICATE RESOURCES
Richard Binhammer, Lionel Menchaca and (formerly) Bob Pearson are probably the most public facing of Dell’s social media team, but the company has more than 30 employees dedicated to its online community customer service team. And it’s not just any people, it’s the right people. People empowered to respond on behalf of the company, people authorized to help.

CREATE A FORUM FOR CONVERSATIONS
Dell was the first large company to implement the SalesForce IdeaStorm offering that allowed customers to propose new ideas to the company that were then voted on by visitors to the site. The best ideas rose to the top and were shared with management. Starbucks followed suit with My Starbucks Idea and the two companies are often cited in social media circles for their willingness to open up direct lines of communications with their customers.

SEGMENT CUSTOMERS AND SPEAK WITH THEM
Gamers, women, small business owners. Dell listened to the conversations happening online and created customer experiences to meet their needs. Great examples of this include the Green community and the Gaming community.

CREATE A HEADQUARTERS WITH MANY BRANCHES
There are 33 corporate Twitter accounts (not to mention countless awesome employee accounts), three Flickr photostreams, 433 YouTube videos, 22 Facebook Groups, 12 Blogs, eight Forums, 18 public wikis, and of course, IdeaStorm. They have a community landing page featured prominently on the Dell site and accounts that are moderated by Dell employees on multiple social media platforms as well.

MEASURE SUCCESS
One of the lessons I’ve learned from Dell’s efforts is that revenue is the old model for a campaign’s success, and it really doesn’t translate well online. People don’t want to be sold to when they’re in a social environment. The best campaigns seem to support customer service, relationship building (between customers, not just between the customer and the brand) and knowledge exchange. Make sure that you’re looking at the appropriate metrics, especially when you’re starting out. These will change over time as you see what works.

CONCLUSION
The $3 million in Twitter revenue was not achieved just by setting up an account and “following” potential customers. It was part of a strategy rolled out over several years that continues to evolve with the tools and the needs of the company’s community. Relationships take time to build. Your brand will make mistakes. What’s important is that you keep trying to find the right fit, that you listen to your customers, and that you give your customers the experience and attention they deserve. In the end, it literally pays off.

Have you learned any lessons from Dell’s experiences? What’s an example of a change you made based on your participation in an online social community?

Twitter Case Study: Motrin Moms

This weekend, there was a bit of excitement on Twitter as outraged moms around the world responded to this advertisement by Motrin:

The tone of the ad is conspiratorial. It’s supposed to be a mom talking directly to other moms who can identify with the the pain caused by carrying around her baby in various types of slings attached to her body.

I have not carried around a baby so I have no idea whether or not it hurts. But so far, I’m convinced by the ad. I mean, an extra 7-15 pounds (is that what babies weigh?) attached to my hips, my front, my back…I would imagine that would hurt after a while, no matter how ingenious the contraption.

Apparently, I’m wrong. And that, my friends, is where the value of market research comes in. And if you don’t do the research, that’s where the true value of social media comes in.

Apparently, there are many moms who have carried around multiple children on their back, their hips, their front. They were not in pain. In fact, quite the opposite. They are not happy with the Motrin ad campaign, and they want you to know about it.

Over the weekend moms on Twitter united in voicing their displeasure with the Motrin ad . They used "#motrinmoms" as the tag for the threaded conversation, making it easy for people to follow.

In less than 24 hours, this video was created as a response to the ad that intersperses the Twitter conversation with images of moms carrying their children in many of the states mentioned in the ad. It’s pretty powerful:

Also, you can see that the story was picked up by mainstream media as well and will likely appear in print tomorrow or the day after.

Motrin’s website was crashed by the traffic, and has yet to recover. Not good.

What’s surprising to most people is not that there was outrage over an ad that didn’t resonate with its target audience so much as the lack of response from Motrin (or its parent company — Johnson & Johnson). Either they are not monitoring some of the most important conversation channels for their target audience (mommy bloggers) like Twitter, Facebook and the blogosphere, or they have not empowered their advertising, public relations or communications teams to respond immediately.

This is far from played out. There are probably some who will argue this is being blown out of proportion. In some ways, I might agree. But let’s look at some initial lessons:

LISTEN : People are talking about companies and brands every day on a variety of platforms. It is the responsibility of the marketing and communications team to monitor these conversations, whether or not they choose to participate. While its not possible to follow everything, even the most simple tools (RSS, Google Alerts) will catch things like this.

BE TRANSPARENT : When you make a mistake, apologize to the community and learn from it. This is an opportunity for Motrin to better understand its audience and to begin a conversation that probably should have started long ago.

There are many more, and I’m sure we’ll all learn from how Motrin handles this in the coming days.

Further reading: Mommy Bloggers Assimilate Johnson & Johnson , Forbes , Pistachio

The Ultimate Guide to Twitter for Communicators

ultimateguide.jpg Today I’m leading a webinar for the IABC on Twitter for Business . As part of that process, I created a handout for participants with some of the most useful Twitter resources I’ve discovered in the last few months.

I’m going to share an expanded version with you. I’ve included a some great introductory videos, my favorite applications for brand mention monitoring, participating and graphing data. There are also links to some blog posts and mainstream articles discussing corporate adoptions of Twitter.

Here’s a list of the categories:

  • Videos
  • Getting Started
  • Desktop Tools for Updating Twitter
  • Create Your Own Twitter Background
  • Applications
  • 90+ URL Shortening Services (via Mashable)
  • Listening/Finding Conversations
  • Twitter Directories
  • Tutorials
  • Twitter on other social networking sites
  • Other Microblogging Platforms
  • Case Studies
  • Journalists on Twitter
  • Following Conversation Threads
  • Statistics
  • Recent Articles/Posts Worth Reading

Ultimate guide to Twitter for Communicators

If you have any feedback on these links, please share them in the comments. And any links to examples of companies using micro-blogging in an innovative way are certainly encouraged.

Umm…Craig Newmark and I traded Tweets!

Twitter Screenshot

Yesterday was One Web Day, a worldwide event to celebrate the Internet and examine some of the key issues that we must address together to sustain it as an open, democratic forum. Since I live near Washington Square Park, I decided to wander down and listen to the heavy lineup of speakers.

What a lineup! Participants included Stanford professor Larry LessigJonathan Zittrain from Harvard Law School’s Berman Center for Internet and Society, Electronic Frontier Foundation co-founder John Perry Barlow and Pandora founder Tim Westergren.

I got there a little late. As I arrived, I saw Craigslist founder Craig Newmark walking the other direction with another gentleman. I didn’t have the nerve to ask for a picture with him, so I did the next best thing: I took out my phone and shared that I just saw him with my friends on Twitter. Apparently he saw it and replied!

My favorite part of the reply is that he says, “I’m no big deal,” under which there’s a picture of him with Barak Obama. Ha!

Twitter received a couple of shout outs during the event, including this quote from Jonathan Zittrain, who explained that, “Twitter is like blogs, but more inane.”

Anyway, I continued to share updates from the event via Twitter, and as a result, ended up posting a short blurb about it on Mashable

The power of Twitter to connect disparate people continues to amaze me!